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Loser

Jerry Spinelli

© 2002 by Jerry Spinelli

HarperCollins Publishers

Donald Zinkoff is the kid that laughs too loud in class, trips over his own feet, and always answers the question wrong. His quirky qualities aren't a big deal until fourth grade, when his classmates brand him "a loser." Yes, Zinkoff is different...but he just may show everyone that any name can someday become "hero."

Crispin: The Cross of Lead

by Avi

Set in 14th-century England, Avi's 50th book begins with a funeral, that of a village outcast whose past is shrouded in mystery and whose adolescent son is known only as "Asta's son." Mired in grief for his mother, the boy learns his given name, Crispin, from the village priest, although his presumably dead father's identity remains obscure. The words etched on his mother's treasured lead cross may provide some clue, but the priest is murdered before he can tell the illiterate lad what they say. Worse, Crispin is fingered for the murder by the manor steward, who declares him a "wolf's head" wanted dead or alive, preferably dead. Crispin flees, and falls in with a traveling juggler. "I have no name," Crispin tells Bear, whose rough manners and appearance mask a tender heart. "No home, no kin, no place in this world." How the boy learns his true identity (he's the bastard son of the lord of the manor) and finds his place in the world makes for a rattling fine yarn. Avi's plot is engineered for maximum thrills, with twists, turns and treachery aplenty, but it's the compellingly drawn relationship between Crispin and Bear that provides the heart of this story.

Memories of My Melancholy Whores


is Gabriel García Márquez’s first work of fiction in ten years, written at the height of his powers, the Spanish edition of which Ilan Stavans called, “Masterful. Erotic. As hypnotizing as it is disturbing” (Los Angeles Times).


On the eve of his ninetieth birthday, our unnamed protagonist–an undistinguished journalist and lifelong bachelor–decides to give himself “the gift of a night of wild love with an adolescent virgin.”


The virgin, whom an old madam procures for him, is splendidly young, with the silent power of a sleeping beauty. The night of love blossoms into a transforming year. It is a year in which he relives, in a rush of memories, his lifetime of (paid-for) sexual adventures and experiences a revelation that brings him to the edge of dying–not of old age, but, at long last, of uncorrupted love.


Memories of My Melancholy Whores is a brilliant gem by the master storyteller.

The House with a Clock in its Walls
by
John Bellairshttps://www.prx.org/pieces/6983-the-house-with-a-clock-in-its-walls-by-john-bellai

In-House VO

for

Avrett, Free, Ginsberg

The Missing  Manatee 
by 
Cynthia DeFelicehttps://www.prx.org/pieces/8993-the-missing-manatee

November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy

by

Dean R. Owen


As the fiftieth anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination draws near, the events of that fateful day will undoubtedly be on the minds of many throughout the world. Here Dean Owen curates a fascinating collection of interviews and thought-provoking commentaries from notable men and women connected to that notorious Friday afternoon. Those who worked closely with the president, civil rights leaders, celebrities, prominent journalists, and political allies are among the nearly one hundred voices asked to share their reflections on the significance of that day and the legacy left behind by John F. Kennedy.

Check out samples of Thom’s work on these sites